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Vatican Museums
1
Recommended by 23 bloggers
Vatican Museums, RomeVatican Museums, RomeVatican Museums, Rome
Vatican Museums, Rome
Vatican Museums, Rome
Vatican Museums, Rome
Vatican Museums, Rome
Vatican Museums, Rome
Vatican Museums, Rome
Whatever your religious views, the Vatican City in central Rome is one of those places that you really can’t visit Rome without seeing. As well as being the seat of Christianity, this place is home to some of mankind’s most famous pieces of art, including Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel. To see this art, you’re going to need to visit the Vatican Museums, which are a huge sprawling collection of corridors and rooms which are home to some of the world’s greatest art treasures. The Vatican Museum is a popular place to visit, so unless .....you are visiting Rome at a very quiet time of year like winter, you’ll want to book your tickets in advance. The best way to do this is directly with the Vatican, as they offer the best value tickets in our experience. Advance tickets include skip the line access and you also get to visit the Sistine Chapel.   Show less
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Spanish Steps
2
Recommended by 16 bloggers
Spanish Steps, RomeSpanish Steps, RomeSpanish Steps, RomeSpanish Steps, RomeSpanish Steps, RomeSpanish Steps, Rome
Spanish Steps, Rome
Spanish Steps, Rome
Spanish Steps, Rome
Spanish Steps, Rome
Spanish Steps, Rome
Spanish Steps, Rome
Expect the Spanish Steps to be crowded midday. Because of the crowds and the large number of tourists, beware of pickpockets here. At the top of the steps is Trinita dei Monti. From here, it’s a nice view back out over the Spanish Steps and over the rooftops of Rome. Pro Travel Tip:  Tired and need a break? Think twice about having a seat on the Spanish Steps. In 2019, a new law was put in place to crack down on “bad behavior” in Rome. If you are caught sitting on the .....Spanish Steps, you risk paying a €400 fine. Show less
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Piazza Navona
3
Recommended by 15 bloggers
Piazza Navona, Rome
Piazza Navona, Rome
Piazza Navona, Rome
Piazza Navona, Rome
Piazza Navona, Rome
Piazza Navona, Rome
Together with two couples from Canada, we meet at the Piazza Navona in front of the magnificent Fountain of the Four Rivers. Dario has studied Art History and proved himself as an extremely competent guide. We immediately noticed his love for the city of Rome. Besides explaining the great historical contexts, he could answer all questions in detail. From Piazza Navona we head towards the Pantheon, passing the Palazzo Madama, the seat of the Italian Senate. The building is named after Margaret of Austria who lived here. She was the illegitimate .....daughter of Charles V and later Governor of the Habsburg Netherlands. One street further, we pass the Palazzo Giustiniani, the seat of the chairman of the senate. In addition, it houses the offices of the senators for life; The palace is connected by an underground corridor with the Palazzo Madama. Please watch the 4k UltraHD Video Show less
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Hotel Colosseum
4
Recommended by 14 bloggers
Hotel Colosseum, RomeHotel Colosseum, RomeHotel Colosseum, RomeHotel Colosseum, RomeHotel Colosseum, RomeHotel Colosseum, Rome
Hotel Colosseum, Rome
Hotel Colosseum, Rome
Hotel Colosseum, Rome
Hotel Colosseum, Rome
Hotel Colosseum, Rome
Hotel Colosseum, Rome
On your visit to the Colosseum, you can either wander through it on your own, take the audio guide tour, or join a guided tour (this should be booked in advance). Most visits last 1 to 3 hours. You can buy an “add-on” ticket that gets you access to the underground and the third level of the Colosseum. It costs an additional €9 and includes a 1.5-hour tour. To buy your tickets in advance and learn more about the “add-on” ticket, visit the official Colosseum ticket office website here. Hours: 8:30 am – .....7:15 pm end of March through August 31 with the last entry at 6:15; reduced hours the remainder of the yearCost: €16 (+€2 online reservation fee) for the combo-ticket that gets you in to the Roman Forum, Palatine Hill, and the Colosseum; €22 Full Experience Ticket, a 2-day ticket which gives you a scheduled entrance into the Colosseum and also includes the Roman Forum and Palatine HillWebsite: Get updated hours and pricing here.  Roma Pass: If you have the Roma Pass, you must make your reservation to visit the Colosseum in advance. There is a €2 reservation fee. Click here for more information.  Getting Here: The closest metro stop is Colosseo. When you exit the metro station, the Colosseum will be right in front of you. Show less
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Albergo del Sole al Pantheon
5
Recommended by 13 bloggers
Albergo del Sole al Pantheon, RomeAlbergo del Sole al Pantheon, RomeAlbergo del Sole al Pantheon, RomeAlbergo del Sole al Pantheon, RomeAlbergo del Sole al Pantheon, RomeAlbergo del Sole al Pantheon, Rome
Albergo del Sole al Pantheon, Rome
Albergo del Sole al Pantheon, Rome
Albergo del Sole al Pantheon, Rome
Albergo del Sole al Pantheon, Rome
Albergo del Sole al Pantheon, Rome
Albergo del Sole al Pantheon, Rome
The Pantheon is old. Really old. The Romans were master builders and the Pantheon is one of their most amazing accomplishments. Construction of the Pantheon was completed around 120 AD. Just think about what this building survived…barbarian raids, wars, earthquakes, and the natural aging of 1900 years of wind, rain, and even snow. For 1300 years, this was the largest dome in the world, until the completion of St. Peter’s Basilica during the Renaissance. But the best part of the Pantheon is the oculus, the circular window in the top of .....the dome, the only source of light inside of the building. When you first walk up to it, the Pantheon looks like an ancient, bulky, worn-out building. But inside, it looks surprisingly nothing like the exterior. It’s beautiful in the inside, with colorful Italian marble and the very unique lighting from the oculus. Hours: Sunday 9 am – 6 pm, last entry 5:45 pm; Monday through Saturday 8:30 am – 7:30 pm, last entry 7:15 pmCost: FreeWebsite:www.pantheonroma.com Show less
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Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano
6
Recommended by 13 bloggers
Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, RomeBasilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, RomeBasilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, RomeBasilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, RomeBasilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, RomeBasilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, Rome
Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, Rome
Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, Rome
Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, Rome
Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, Rome
Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, Rome
Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, Rome
From St. Peter’s Basilica, it is a very nice walk along the Tiber River to get to the Borghese Gallery. As you walk towards Castel Sant’Angelo, make a detour to Borgo Pio. Along this street are some great restaurants to visit for lunch. These include Borgo 139, Mama Eat Street Food, and Borghiciana Pastificio Artiginale. Castel Sant’Angelo was built as a mausoleum for Emperor Hadrian and his family. At the time it was built, in 139 AD, it was the tallest building in Rome. Later, it was converted to a military .....fortress and then to a castle that was used as a papal residence. Today, it is a museum. You can tour Castel Sant’Angelo or just admire it from the outside. Cost: €14Hours: Tuesday through Sunday 9 am to 7:30 pm From Castel Sant’Angelo, continue the walk along the Tiber River, cross the river and enter Piazza del Popolo, and then continue into the gardens that surround the Borghese Gallery (see our map above for more details). Show less
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Colosseum
7
Recommended by 11 bloggers
Colosseum, RomeColosseum, RomeColosseum, RomeColosseum, RomeColosseum, RomeColosseum, Rome
Colosseum, Rome
Colosseum, Rome
Colosseum, Rome
Colosseum, Rome
Colosseum, Rome
Colosseum, Rome
The Colosseum Panoramic View Tour takes you up to the 3rd, 4th and 5th floors of the Colosseum, which are not open to the general public. The tour is also referred to as the Belvedere tour, which means “beautiful view”. These floors offer you a spectacular panoramic view of the Colosseum from high above the ground, and are worth doing if you want a unique perspective of the arena. As with the arena, access to these levels is only available as part of a tour, with the official website offering guided tours .....in English. Again, these tours are in limited supply and book out far in advance. If you are interested in both the underground and the panoramic view, there is also a tour which includes both of them. You can see all the options here. Note that these tours include access to the main part of the Colosseum as well, so you don’t need to buy them separately. Once your tour is complete, you can explore the other parts of the Colosseum at your leisure. Do be aware that the official website does list cheaper tickets for the underground and panoramic areas, which do not include a tour guide. These tickets are aimed at official tour companies rather than individuals. The tickets are only valid with an authorized guide, however a guide is not provided – you would need to arrange one yourself. As well as being authorized, the guide also needs to provide a list of everyone coming on official headed notepaper. This is likely beyond the scope of most visitors to arrange, hence we suggest the guided options. Note: according to the news heading in the right hand column of the official ticket website here, as of 2020 access to levels 4 & 5 is temporarily closed. You can still access level 3 however. Do check this page prior to booking any special access tickets to see if any closures affect you.   Show less
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Market at Piazza Campo de'Fiori
8
Recommended by 10 bloggers
Market at Piazza Campo de'Fiori, RomeMarket at Piazza Campo de'Fiori, RomeMarket at Piazza Campo de'Fiori, RomeMarket at Piazza Campo de'Fiori, RomeMarket at Piazza Campo de'Fiori, RomeMarket at Piazza Campo de'Fiori, Rome
Market at Piazza Campo de'Fiori, Rome
Market at Piazza Campo de'Fiori, Rome
Market at Piazza Campo de'Fiori, Rome
Market at Piazza Campo de'Fiori, Rome
Market at Piazza Campo de'Fiori, Rome
Market at Piazza Campo de'Fiori, Rome
Similar to Piazza Navona, Campo de Fiori is smaller and filled with more stalls and shops than restaurants. This is our final stop of the day. However, if you still have plenty of time left, consider walking across the Tiber River to Trastevere, a great neighborhood to wander and have dinner. We had a wonderful dinner at Carlo Menta.
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Piazzale Scipione Borghese
9
Recommended by 9 bloggers
Piazzale Scipione Borghese, RomePiazzale Scipione Borghese, RomePiazzale Scipione Borghese, RomePiazzale Scipione Borghese, RomePiazzale Scipione Borghese, RomePiazzale Scipione Borghese, Rome
Piazzale Scipione Borghese, Rome
Piazzale Scipione Borghese, Rome
Piazzale Scipione Borghese, Rome
Piazzale Scipione Borghese, Rome
Piazzale Scipione Borghese, Rome
Piazzale Scipione Borghese, Rome
The Borghese Gallery is home to one of the most impressive collections of art in Rome. It has pieces from artists including Caravaggio, Bernini and Raphael, and is a must for any art lover in the city. The really nice thing about the Borghese Gallery is that visitor numbers are strictly controlled. Entry has to be reserved in advance, and only 360 people can visit at a time. When you visit, you’ll have two hours to see the pieces on display. Compared to many other art museums in Rome, this is a .....much less crowded experience. Whilst the museum isn’t huge, pretty much everything on display is a masterpiece. So your two hours will be filled with wow moments!   Show less
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Roma Pass
10
Recommended by 8 bloggers
Roma Pass, Rome
Roma Pass, Rome
Roma Pass, Rome
Roma Pass, Rome
Roma Pass, Rome
Roma Pass, Rome
The Rome and Vatican Pass includes the Roma Pass as well as skip the line entry to the Vatican City attractions like St. Peter’s Basilica and the Vatican Museums. This is our preferred pass if you are visiting Rome for 3 days, Entry to the Colosseum is included (as part of the Roma Pass part of the pass), but you do still need to reserve the timeslot in advance and pay the €2 reservation fee. The same caveat in terms of availability also applies to the Roma Pass. The Rome and Vatican .....Pass also includes a Hop on Hop off bus, audioguides for many of the attractions, a guidebook to Rome, and lots more.   Show less
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Colosseo
11
Recommended by 6 bloggers
Colosseo, RomeColosseo, RomeColosseo, RomeColosseo, RomeColosseo, RomeColosseo, Rome
Colosseo, Rome
Colosseo, Rome
Colosseo, Rome
Colosseo, Rome
Colosseo, Rome
Colosseo, Rome
Lines tend to be long to get into the Colosseum, even first thing in the morning. We highly recommend buying your entrance ticket in advance.It costs an extra €2 per ticket for the online reservation fee, but this is worth it to avoid standing in long lines. If tickets are sold out for your dates of travel, I recommend joining a skip-the-line tour of the Colosseum. You will spend a little more money than purchasing your tickets directly from the Colosseum website, but you will save a lot of time. And if .....you only have 2 days in Rome, your time is very valuable. Here are several highly rated skip-the-line tours of the Colosseum. Show less
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Catacombs of Domitilla
12
Recommended by 5 bloggers
Catacombs of Domitilla, RomeCatacombs of Domitilla, RomeCatacombs of Domitilla, RomeCatacombs of Domitilla, RomeCatacombs of Domitilla, RomeCatacombs of Domitilla, Rome
Catacombs of Domitilla, Rome
Catacombs of Domitilla, Rome
Catacombs of Domitilla, Rome
Catacombs of Domitilla, Rome
Catacombs of Domitilla, Rome
Catacombs of Domitilla, Rome
In addition to the San Sebastian Catacombs, you can also visit the San Callisto Catacombs, which are just a few hundred meters further down the Appian Way. The San Callisto Catacombs tend to be more crowded and some people say they are better than San Sebastian. We only went to the San Sebastian Catacombs so we cannot comment on whether or not San Callisto is worthwhile. It is important to know that both Catacombs close at lunchtime. Also, the San Sebastian Catacombs are closed on Sundays and the San Callisto Catacombs are closed on Wednesdays.
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Piazza Navona
13
Recommended by 5 bloggers
Piazza Navona, RomePiazza Navona, RomePiazza Navona, RomePiazza Navona, RomePiazza Navona, RomePiazza Navona, Rome
Piazza Navona, Rome
Piazza Navona, Rome
Piazza Navona, Rome
Piazza Navona, Rome
Piazza Navona, Rome
Piazza Navona, Rome
We like to stay in one of three areas in Rome: the Historic District around the Pantheon and Piazza Navona, the area north of the Vatican, which has several nice family owned small hotels, and, our favorite, Trastevere. They all have their advantages, mostly centering around what you're planning on visiting. I should also add, that the area around the main train station, Termini, has cheaper accommodations than the others I've mentioned, but the neighborhood is a little more business and a bit noisier than the other's I've mentioned. Of .....course, all Rome is noisy, but what big city isn't? Find a Rome hotel at Hotels.com Find a Rome hotel at Booking.com Find a Rome hotel at Agoda.com Show less
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Palatine Hill
14
Recommended by 5 bloggers
Palatine Hill, Rome
Palatine Hill, Rome
Palatine Hill, Rome
Palatine Hill, Rome
Palatine Hill, Rome
Palatine Hill, Rome
The Roman Forum is the historical center of Rome. This is ancient Rome, a complex of government buildings, temples, and marketplaces from 2000 years ago. Palatine Hill is one of the seven hills of Rome. It sits next to the Roman Forum. There are several archaelogical sites here and you get a nice view over the Roman Forum.  There are several entrances into the Roman Forum. The Palatine Hill entrance on Via di San Gregorio usually has the shortest line. Enter here, and later, exit at the gate nearest the Colosseum.
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Sistine Chapel
15
Recommended by 5 bloggers
Sistine Chapel, RomeSistine Chapel, RomeSistine Chapel, RomeSistine Chapel, RomeSistine Chapel, RomeSistine Chapel, Rome
Sistine Chapel, Rome
Sistine Chapel, Rome
Sistine Chapel, Rome
Sistine Chapel, Rome
Sistine Chapel, Rome
Sistine Chapel, Rome
Opt for an early morning to beat the crowds and see the Sistine Chapel on the Pristine Sistine tour offered by Walks of Italy. It's more expensive than just entering on your own, but it's worth it for the small group size and the chance to see the Sistine Chapel and not be packed in like a bunch of sardines (especially helpful in the summer when temperatures soar and there is no air conditioning). While you're in the area, visit St. Peter's Basilica and St. Peter's square. Send a postcard .....from the world's smallest country, but make sure to check the hours on the website if you want an official Vatican Stamp. Show less
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Naples
16
Recommended by 5 bloggers
Naples, RomeNaples, RomeNaples, RomeNaples, RomeNaples, RomeNaples, Rome
Naples, Rome
Naples, Rome
Naples, Rome
Naples, Rome
Naples, Rome
Naples, Rome
From Naples, take the Circumvesuviana train to Sorrento. Upon arrival in Napoli Centrale, follow signs for “Circumvesuviana.” The train platform is downstairs. You can purchase tickets at the ticket office located next to the platform or at the newspaper/tobacco shops in the train station. Purchase a ticket to Sorrento (€4.50). Trains leave approximately every 30 minutes. There is no need to purchase this ticket in advance. (Click here for the Circumvesuviana timetable). Make sure you validate your ticket before getting on the train. It takes between 45 minutes and 75 minutes to travel between .....Naples and Sorrento. The direttissimo trains are the fastest because they make the fewest stops. The Circumvesuviana is a commuter train, a local train that is more like the subway in New York City than the Italian high speed trains. There is no air conditioning and during the summer months it can get quite hot and crowded on this train. Sometimes it can be standing room only. And beware of pickpockets, not only on the trains but also in the train stations. Show less
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Ostia Antica
17
Recommended by 5 bloggers
Ostia Antica, RomeOstia Antica, RomeOstia Antica, RomeOstia Antica, RomeOstia Antica, RomeOstia Antica, Rome
Ostia Antica, Rome
Ostia Antica, Rome
Ostia Antica, Rome
Ostia Antica, Rome
Ostia Antica, Rome
Ostia Antica, Rome
    You have the choice of visiting the archeological park alone or you can schedule a guided tour in Ostia Antica.  I had a guide for my visit, which was so wonderful! There are just way too many details and things to see in the park to walk around alone and without context!   If you choose a tour, you can explore just Ostia Antica or combine it with other nearby archeological sites. See the tours available here.    
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Roma Termini
18
Recommended by 5 bloggers
Roma Termini, RomeRoma Termini, RomeRoma Termini, Rome
Roma Termini, Rome
Roma Termini, Rome
Roma Termini, Rome
Roma Termini, Rome
Roma Termini, Rome
Roma Termini, Rome
There is no direct connection from Rome to Lake Garda. However, you can take the train to Verona Porta Nuova, take the train to Domegliara-S.Ambrog., take the drive to Torri, take the car ferry to Maderno, then take the drive to Lake Garda. Alternatively, you can take a vehicle from Rome to Lake Garda via Verona, Verona, Verona, Pesina, Torri, and Maderno in around 10h 1m.
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Piazza della Trinità dei Monti
19
Recommended by 4 bloggers
Piazza della Trinità dei Monti, Rome
Piazza della Trinità dei Monti, Rome
Piazza della Trinità dei Monti, Rome
Piazza della Trinità dei Monti, Rome
Piazza della Trinità dei Monti, Rome
Piazza della Trinità dei Monti, Rome
The Trevi Fountain is one of Rome’s most famous icons. We were in Rome the summer of 2014, a time when many of the most popular sites were covered with scaffolding (the Trevi Fountain, the Colosseum, the the Trinita de Monti at the top of the Spanish Steps). It was disappointing for us, but now everything should be gleaming and look almost brand new. Fendi funded the most recent renovation, which took over one year to complete. State of the art LED lights illuminate the fountain…it must be an awesome sight .....to see! Legend has it that if you throw a coin into the Trevi Fountain, you will be ensured a visit to Rome. This is such a popular activity that an estimated $1.5 million USD was thrown into the fountain in 2016! Hours: Always openCost: Free Show less
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St. Peter's Basilica
20
Recommended by 4 bloggers
St. Peter's Basilica, RomeSt. Peter's Basilica, RomeSt. Peter's Basilica, RomeSt. Peter's Basilica, RomeSt. Peter's Basilica, RomeSt. Peter's Basilica, Rome
St. Peter's Basilica, Rome
St. Peter's Basilica, Rome
St. Peter's Basilica, Rome
St. Peter's Basilica, Rome
St. Peter's Basilica, Rome
St. Peter's Basilica, Rome
After visiting the Basilica, don't miss the chance to visit the Sacred Grottoes or Crypt where the tombs of many popes and other dignitaries are interred. The Crypt lies beneath the church and contained the tomb of John Paul II up until his beatification in May of 2011. At the end of the Crypt lies a glass wall which offers a view down to the tomb of St Peter which is located directly below the Papal Altar.
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Rome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport
21
Recommended by 4 bloggers
Rome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, RomeRome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, RomeRome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, RomeRome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, RomeRome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, RomeRome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, Rome
Rome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, Rome
Rome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, Rome
Rome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, Rome
Rome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, Rome
Rome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, Rome
Rome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, Rome
If you aren’t arriving in Rome on a cruise excursion, you’re probably flying into the airport to cruise out of Civitavecchia. Two airports service the city, Ciampino and Fiumicino Leonardo da Vinci Airport, and getting from each of them into the city centre is a breeze. Executive shuttle buses will take you from arrivals to the train station in 45 minutes for under ten euros, from where you can hop on the subway into the centre for another €1.80. If you decide to get a taxi, bear in mind that .....there are set fees in place for airport transfers and it is illegal for drivers to charge you more. A taxi from Ciampino into Rome should cost €30 including luggage. Taxis from Fiumicino to the city will cost €48. Show less
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Villa Borghese
22
Recommended by 3 bloggers
Villa Borghese, RomeVilla Borghese, RomeVilla Borghese, RomeVilla Borghese, RomeVilla Borghese, RomeVilla Borghese, Rome
Villa Borghese, Rome
Villa Borghese, Rome
Villa Borghese, Rome
Villa Borghese, Rome
Villa Borghese, Rome
Villa Borghese, Rome
Villa Borghese is a huge public park and a great place to absorb the space, the light, the feel of Italy, without worrying about kids, crowds, and costs. It isn’t all about tranquility though; it has a lake, museums, skateboarding, secret and not-so-secret gardens and winter ice skating. It also houses one of the best art galleries for families. There are too many things to do in Rome to mention here. Find a decent Rome guidebook (there are several that tackle Rome with kids) or just follow your nose and wander the .....maze of squares and back streets. Watch the Italians as they parade about on their scooters. But make sure you keep an eye on your valuables, especially on public transport, as families with their mass of iTechnology are easy targets for thieves. And then it’s time for the highlight of Rome, your first sight of The Vatican. Show less
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Mount Vesuvius
23
Recommended by 3 bloggers
Mount Vesuvius, RomeMount Vesuvius, RomeMount Vesuvius, RomeMount Vesuvius, RomeMount Vesuvius, RomeMount Vesuvius, Rome
Mount Vesuvius, Rome
Mount Vesuvius, Rome
Mount Vesuvius, Rome
Mount Vesuvius, Rome
Mount Vesuvius, Rome
Mount Vesuvius, Rome
If you have your own car, it takes one hour to drive between Naples and Sorrento. On the way you will pass Mt. Vesuvius and Pompeii. Consider spending several hours here. If you don’t like the idea of taking the Circumvesuviana and don’t have a rental car, consider hiring a private driver. This costs much more than the train, but it is a more comfortable way to travel and you do not have to worry about standing over your luggage during the one hour journey on the Circumvesuviana. Sorrento Silver Star is .....a reputable company that provides private drivers, not only for transportation to and from Naples but also for day trips along the Amalfi Coast. Here is a private driver through Get Your Guide that gets excellent reviews. Show less
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Best Rome Driver
24
Recommended by 3 bloggers
Best Rome Driver, Rome
Best Rome Driver, Rome
Best Rome Driver, Rome
Best Rome Driver, Rome
Best Rome Driver, Rome
Best Rome Driver, Rome
This is the easiest way to travel around the Amalfi Coast. The road can be difficult to drive, with hairpin turns and distracting but gorgeous views along the coast. Add in the traffic of tour buses and many other cars, especially during the summer months, and this drive begins to feel more like work than a fun road trip. And you haven’t even tried to park your car yet (the closest spots you may find are a mile or farther from town). A private driver is the most expensive option but .....it’s also the one we recommend the most. If you plan on enjoying your experience here at the Amalfi Coast, hire a private driver. Again, we recommend Sorrento Silver Star. Show less
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Trenitalia Spa
25
Recommended by 3 bloggers
Trenitalia Spa, RomeTrenitalia Spa, RomeTrenitalia Spa, RomeTrenitalia Spa, RomeTrenitalia Spa, RomeTrenitalia Spa, Rome
Trenitalia Spa, Rome
Trenitalia Spa, Rome
Trenitalia Spa, Rome
Trenitalia Spa, Rome
Trenitalia Spa, Rome
Trenitalia Spa, Rome
Trenitalia, Italy’s national rail service, has three classes of trains. The frecce trains(frecciarossa, frecciargento, and freccebianca) are the fastest, with travel times of around one hour or slightly longer. These are the most expensive Trenitalia trains. These trains need to be booked in advance. Intercity trainstake about 2 hours and reservations are recommended. Regionale trains take about 3 hours and do not have seat reservations. How to book your Trenitalia tickets online: Trenitalia.com is the main website. The website is offered in English but you will have to input city names with their Italian .....spelling (Roma for Rome and Napoli for Naples). Italiarail.com is easier to use than Trenitalia (no Italian names necessary) but there is small booking fee ($5 USD) for using this website. Show less
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Santa Maria Maggiore
26
Recommended by 3 bloggers
Santa Maria Maggiore, Rome
Santa Maria Maggiore, Rome
Santa Maria Maggiore, Rome
Santa Maria Maggiore, Rome
Santa Maria Maggiore, Rome
Santa Maria Maggiore, Rome
One of Rome’s four man-centric basilicas and an essential journey church, Santa Maria Maggiore has the refinement of being the main church in Rome to have praised mass each and every day since the fifth century. The area of the basilica was dictated by a dream of the fourth-century Pope Liberius, in which the Virgin guided him to fabricate a congregation where the snow fell the next day. At the point when snow fell on the Esquiline slope the following morning, August 5, the Pope requested the congregation assembled. Increments were .....made in later hundreds of years: another apse in the thirteenth century; Rome’s tallest campanile in 1377; and in the late fifteenth century, the gold coffered roof by Giuliano da Sangallo, enhanced with the primary gold from America. Two side sanctuaries included the sixteenth century, structure transepts: Cappella Sistina, on the right, contains a bronze sanctuary and the tombs of two popes, while Cappella Paolina has a lavishly enhanced altarpiece. On the canopied high special stepped area, a very adored picture of the Virgin is customarily ascribed to St. Luke, yet is in actuality a thirteenth-century work. Also Read:Top 10 Most Famous Domes Of The World Show less
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Largo di Torre Argentina
27
Recommended by 3 bloggers
Largo di Torre Argentina, RomeLargo di Torre Argentina, RomeLargo di Torre Argentina, RomeLargo di Torre Argentina, RomeLargo di Torre Argentina, RomeLargo di Torre Argentina, Rome
Largo di Torre Argentina, Rome
Largo di Torre Argentina, Rome
Largo di Torre Argentina, Rome
Largo di Torre Argentina, Rome
Largo di Torre Argentina, Rome
Largo di Torre Argentina, Rome
The square is named after the Torre Argentina (Strasbourg tower), built by the Papal Master of Ceremonies Johannes Burckhardt who came from Strasbourg (Latin name: Argentoratum). The excavations include a total of four Roman temples and in the western part behind the round temple, a building of the Senate. Here, Gaius Julius Caesar was murdered.
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Arch of Constantine
28
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Arch of Constantine, RomeArch of Constantine, RomeArch of Constantine, RomeArch of Constantine, RomeArch of Constantine, RomeArch of Constantine, Rome
Arch of Constantine, Rome
Arch of Constantine, Rome
Arch of Constantine, Rome
Arch of Constantine, Rome
Arch of Constantine, Rome
Arch of Constantine, Rome
Built during the height of the Roman Empire, in around 70 AD, the Colosseum is the largest amphitheatre ever built. In Italian, it’s called the Colosseo.  It was built primarily as a venue for spectators to watch events, most famously gladiator style combat matches to the death. It also played host to battle re-enactments, mock sea battles (only briefly), executions, and theatre dramas. The name comes from the fact that it was built next to a gigantic statue of the Emperor Nero which was referred to as the Colossus of Nero, although .....this statue no longer exists. However, the name Colossus somehow ended up being transferred from the statue to the Colosseum, probably in reference to the large size of the amphitheatre. When it was built, the official name of the Colosseum was the Flavian Amphitheatre, although it is believed that Romans of the time would have referred to it as the Amphitheatrum Caesareum. It’s also often referred to as the Coliseum, which is a general term for large outdoor stadiums. The Colosseum was designed to house up to 80,000 spectators, putting it on a par with today’s modern sport stadiums. Average audience attendance for events was around 65,000, with attendees including everyone from emperors to working class people. Following the fall of the Roman Empire, the Colosseum continued to be used as a space for workshops and other events. In the 12th century it was used as a fortified dwelling by a wealthy family. Unfortunately, a major earthquake in the middle of the 14th century caused serious damage, and parts of the Colosseum were destroyed. Over the years, the stone of the Colosseum was used for other buildings, leading to much of the structure disappearing. It wasn’t until the mid 18th century that the value of the Colosseum was recognised, and efforts were put in place to protect it. It was deemed a holy place by the Pope, due to the many Christians who were believed to have died on the arena floor. The church made efforts to protect the building, and reinforcements and repairs took place throughout the 19th century. Today, the Colosseum is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Rome, and is visited by millions of people every year. It forms a part of the Historic Centre of Rome UNESCO world heritage site.   Show less
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Capitoline Museums
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Capitoline Museums, RomeCapitoline Museums, RomeCapitoline Museums, RomeCapitoline Museums, RomeCapitoline Museums, RomeCapitoline Museums, Rome
Capitoline Museums, Rome
Capitoline Museums, Rome
Capitoline Museums, Rome
Capitoline Museums, Rome
Capitoline Museums, Rome
Capitoline Museums, Rome
Firstly and most importantly are the Capitoline Museums. In its heyday, Capitoline Hill was the political and economic centre of Rome. Thousands of years later, it is fittingly home to some of Rome’s best sculptures, paintings and other works. You can’t miss the famous Capitoline Wolf, the Flying Gaul and Colossus of Constantine.
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La Dolce Vita Rome
30
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La Dolce Vita Rome, RomeLa Dolce Vita Rome, RomeLa Dolce Vita Rome, RomeLa Dolce Vita Rome, RomeLa Dolce Vita Rome, RomeLa Dolce Vita Rome, Rome
La Dolce Vita Rome, Rome
La Dolce Vita Rome, Rome
La Dolce Vita Rome, Rome
La Dolce Vita Rome, Rome
La Dolce Vita Rome, Rome
La Dolce Vita Rome, Rome
As Alitalia’s hub, perhaps not surprisingly you’ll find numerous Alitalia lounges at Rome Fiumicino Airport. With four to choose from, the Dolce Vita Lounge can be found in Terminal 1 while the Borromini near Boarding area D, Giotto near Boarding area G, and Le Navi near Boarding H lounges can be found in Terminal 3. While complimentary entry is granted to passengers on eligible tickets, the good news is that for 30 Euro you can also purchase a single admission to Alitalia lounges.
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Trevi Fountain
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Trevi Fountain, RomeTrevi Fountain, RomeTrevi Fountain, RomeTrevi Fountain, RomeTrevi Fountain, RomeTrevi Fountain, Rome
Trevi Fountain, Rome
Trevi Fountain, Rome
Trevi Fountain, Rome
Trevi Fountain, Rome
Trevi Fountain, Rome
Trevi Fountain, Rome
Most of our drivers were friends of each other with careers in fields far removed from tourism. Some were architects or doctors and they all loved their Vespas. Every once in a while they take a group of tourists out for a spin and we were lucky enough to be that group. We would drive to each stop where our guide would walk us through Rome's colorful history while our drivers waited and puffed on their smokes. A common sight here in Rome.
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Roman Forum
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Roman Forum, RomeRoman Forum, RomeRoman Forum, RomeRoman Forum, RomeRoman Forum, RomeRoman Forum, Rome
Roman Forum, Rome
Roman Forum, Rome
Roman Forum, Rome
Roman Forum, Rome
Roman Forum, Rome
Roman Forum, Rome
Gazing on it today, a picturesque shambles of ruins and weeds, you would hardly guess that the Forum was the symbol of civic pride for 1,000 years. Its humble beginning, more than 3,000 years ago, was a swampy cemetery for the original village on Palatine Hill. Gradually it rose, ever more glorified, as Rome’s power grew. After the marsh was finally drained off in the 6th century BC, it took on its central role in the life of the Republic. The Forum showed its most elegant face starting with the .....reign of Augustus, the first Roman emperor, who is said to have turned the city from brick to marble. (Photo courtesy of iStock) Show less
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Marcus Aurelius Column
33
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Marcus Aurelius Column, RomeMarcus Aurelius Column, RomeMarcus Aurelius Column, RomeMarcus Aurelius Column, RomeMarcus Aurelius Column, RomeMarcus Aurelius Column, Rome
Marcus Aurelius Column, Rome
Marcus Aurelius Column, Rome
Marcus Aurelius Column, Rome
Marcus Aurelius Column, Rome
Marcus Aurelius Column, Rome
Marcus Aurelius Column, Rome
One of the hard to miss buildings in Piazza Venezia, Il Vittoriano (also Altare della Patria and the National Monument to Victor Emmanuel II) is a 19th Century monument dedicated to Victor Emmanuel II, the first king of a unified Italy. The beauty of this massive monument is subject for debate (many Italians find it ugly). Nevertheless, this unique piece of work has plenty to offer — from its numerous sculptures to its unbeatable panoramic views of Rome. To get to the viewing area of Il Vittoriano, you have to .....take the glass lift and pay a fee of €7. Show less
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Saint Peter's Square
34
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Saint Peter's Square, RomeSaint Peter's Square, RomeSaint Peter's Square, RomeSaint Peter's Square, RomeSaint Peter's Square, RomeSaint Peter's Square, Rome
Saint Peter's Square, Rome
Saint Peter's Square, Rome
Saint Peter's Square, Rome
Saint Peter's Square, Rome
Saint Peter's Square, Rome
Saint Peter's Square, Rome
The Omnia Vatican and Rome Card gets you free or reduced entry into most of the main attractions in Rome and Vatican City over a three day period (consecutive days). Public transport is also available for Omnia cardholders, as is fast track entry into many sites and museums.
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Italy
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Italy, Rome
Italy, Rome
Italy, Rome
Italy, Rome
Italy, Rome
Italy, Rome
From Capri, you can take the return boat journey back to Naples, or go instead to Sorrento and then work your way backward. The Amalfi Coast is so charming that you could easily dedicate an entire week of your Italy itinerary to exploring this region. That said, three days is ample. Dedicate one day to visiting Sorrento, exploring its winding passageways, and sampling handmade Italian gelato beneath the cover of lemon groves. Don’t miss the Church of St. Francesco whose location offers incredible views out to the Sea and the .....Bay of Naples. Spend your other two days in the Amalfi Coast exploring the adorable little seafront towns and villages that cause people to fall in love with this region. Start with glamorous Positano, and continue on to the mountaintop town of Ravello, and the medieval town of Amalfi. For incredible views, consider taking on the somewhat challenging “path of the Gods” hike. The route offers breathtaking panoramas over the pastel-coloured towns of the Amalfi Coast and out to Capri. There are several Cinque Terre hiking routes that weave throughout the region, and offer something to suit every ability. Show less
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Terminal A Hop-On-Hop-Off Bus
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Terminal A Hop-On-Hop-Off Bus, RomeTerminal A Hop-On-Hop-Off Bus, RomeTerminal A Hop-On-Hop-Off Bus, RomeTerminal A Hop-On-Hop-Off Bus, RomeTerminal A Hop-On-Hop-Off Bus, RomeTerminal A Hop-On-Hop-Off Bus, Rome
Terminal A Hop-On-Hop-Off Bus, Rome
Terminal A Hop-On-Hop-Off Bus, Rome
Terminal A Hop-On-Hop-Off Bus, Rome
Terminal A Hop-On-Hop-Off Bus, Rome
Terminal A Hop-On-Hop-Off Bus, Rome
Terminal A Hop-On-Hop-Off Bus, Rome
You can easily get to Ostia Antica from Rome via public transportation. If you are leaving from Termini Station, simply take the B line to Porta San Paolo (Piramide) and then transfer to the Rome-Lido line headed towards Cristoforo Colombo. Get off at the stop for Ostia Antica.   Once you are in Ostia Antica, you can reach the archeological park using the blue pedestrian route. The journey takes about an hour and costs 1.50 euros (about $2.00 USD).    
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Carabè Firenze
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Carabè Firenze, RomeCarabè Firenze, RomeCarabè Firenze, Rome
Carabè Firenze, Rome
Carabè Firenze, Rome
Carabè Firenze, Rome
Carabè Firenze, Rome
Carabè Firenze, Rome
Carabè Firenze, Rome
They say you always remember your first time. Gelateria Carabé was the place Roger took us to all those years ago. It was dark and we were wearing our winter coats and gloves but it was still a great spot. We’ve been back several times since and it never disappoints! It also features amazing granite and cannoli!
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St Maria Sopra Minerva Basilica
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St Maria Sopra Minerva Basilica, RomeSt Maria Sopra Minerva Basilica, RomeSt Maria Sopra Minerva Basilica, RomeSt Maria Sopra Minerva Basilica, RomeSt Maria Sopra Minerva Basilica, RomeSt Maria Sopra Minerva Basilica, Rome
St Maria Sopra Minerva Basilica, Rome
St Maria Sopra Minerva Basilica, Rome
St Maria Sopra Minerva Basilica, Rome
St Maria Sopra Minerva Basilica, Rome
St Maria Sopra Minerva Basilica, Rome
St Maria Sopra Minerva Basilica, Rome
Based on the site of the previous sanctuary of Minerva, which represents its name, Santa Maria Sopra Minerva is the biggest Gothic church in Rome (and one of only a handful few in that style). Started around 1280 and finished in 1453, its middle city area and administration by the proclaiming request of Dominicans made it mainstream with the general population of Rome, and as should be obvious from the quantity of grave-chunks in the floor and on the dividers; it has assumed an imperative job in the city’s religious .....life. The best known about the funerary churches in this three-aisled basilica is the Carafa Chapel toward the finish of the south transept, otherwise called the Chapel of the Annunciation of St. Thomas, well known for its frescoes by Filippo Lippi (1489). This laud both the Virgin and St. Thomas Aquinas, an individual from the Dominican request, with scenes from his life. The high special raised area contains the relics of St. Catherine of Siena, and before the special stepped area, on the left, is a 1521 statue of the Risen Christ by Michelangelo. In spite of the fact that it was scrutinized amid Michelangelo’s lifetime as looking more like an agnostic god than the organizer of Christianity (the undergarment was included later), the excellent aptitude in designing awed different specialists – — the painter Sebastiano del Piombo kept up that Christ’s knees in this work were worth more than every one of the structures in Rome. It is one of the most beautiful churches in Rome you must visit. Show less
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St. Andrew's Church of Scotland
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St. Andrew's Church of Scotland, Rome
St. Andrew's Church of Scotland, Rome
St. Andrew's Church of Scotland, Rome
St. Andrew's Church of Scotland, Rome
St. Andrew's Church of Scotland, Rome
St. Andrew's Church of Scotland, Rome
If you are not one interested in the Good Friday Mass, then you can take a guided tour of the Path of Illumination as devised by Dan Brown in his bestselling novel ‘Angels & Demons’. Historically, the church may have opposed a lot of scientific discoveries but this trail likes to believe otherwise. On this tour you will cover the Four Altars of Science - St. Maria del Popolo Church, St. Peter's Square, St. Maria della Vittoria Church and Piazza Navona. It will eventually lead you to the ‘Church .....of Illumination’ itself, the Castel Sant’Angelo. The tour is a great way to explore Rome and get closer to reliving your Robert Langdon fantasy! Check out the official Angels and Demons tour here. Show less
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Villa d'Este
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Villa d'Este, RomeVilla d'Este, RomeVilla d'Este, RomeVilla d'Este, RomeVilla d'Este, RomeVilla d'Este, Rome
Villa d'Este, Rome
Villa d'Este, Rome
Villa d'Este, Rome
Villa d'Este, Rome
Villa d'Este, Rome
Villa d'Este, Rome
This garden really packs a punch! The Villa d’Este in Tivoli near Rome, Italy, is home to around 500 different fountains. The biggest and most impressive of them all is the Neptune Fountain, with its water jets on different levels shooting up several metres into the air. The deafeningly loud display delights countless numbers of tourists every year. Next time you’re in Europe, keep in mind these tourist rules you never realized you had to follow.
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Little London
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Little London, Rome
Little London, Rome
Little London, Rome
Little London, Rome
Little London, Rome
Little London, Rome
Located just 10 minutes away from Shoreditch Underground Station, and just over 1 kilometer from Liverpool Street, The Shoreditch Inn is one of the best B&Bs in London. It is conveniently located with easy access to the shuttle bus stop leading to London Stansted Airport and other major bus stops. It offers cheap soundproofed rooms with private bathroom with courtesy kit available, a flat screen TVs and free Wi- Fi as well as tea and coffee making facilities. Every morning you will start your day with a continental breakfast while for your .....meals you can choose one of the many pubs and restaurants in the area. Show less
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Piazza Gian Lorenzo Bernini
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Piazza Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Rome
Piazza Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Rome
Piazza Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Rome
Piazza Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Rome
Piazza Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Rome
Piazza Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Rome
Trevi fountain was not always as spectacular as it is now. In 1629, Pope Urban VIII was unimpressed with the earlier version of the fountain, claiming it lacked drama. The Pope asked prominent architect and artist, Gian Lorenzo Bernini to design possible renovations for the fountain. The renovations were never completed though, as the project was abandoned when Pope Urban died. Fast forward to 1730 and Pope Clement XII would be organizing a contest, one with an amazing prize. The winner of this contest would be commissioned to redesign Trevi Fountain. The .....original winner was Alessandro Galilei, but Romans were outraged that a Florentine had been chosen. To silence the outcry, the second place contestant, Nicola Salvi, was awarded the commission. Salvi soon began designing the new fountain around the theme “Taming of the Waters”. Construction began in 1732, with Palazzo Poli serving as a backdrop. The fountain’s facade and sea reef were made from travertine, a form of limestone deposited by mineral springs. The statues were carved from Carrara marble. Unfortunately Salvi would not live to see completion of his masterpiece. After his death in 1751, Giuseppe Pannini took charge of the project, completing the fountain in 1762. The finished fountain would be the largest Baroque fountain in the city- 26.3 metres high and 49.15 metres wide. Show less
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National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art
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National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art, RomeNational Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art, RomeNational Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art, RomeNational Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art, RomeNational Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art, RomeNational Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art, Rome
National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art, Rome
National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art, Rome
National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art, Rome
National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art, Rome
National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art, Rome
National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art, Rome
After you’ve worn yourself out with all of Rome’s ancient works, head to GNAM. Home to Italy’s most extensive collection of 19th-20th century art, it’s a perfect choice for a contemporary afternoon in Rome. Stroll through the likes of Giacomo Balla, Antonio Canova and Amedeo Modigliani and bear witness to the evolution of Italian art.
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Pantheon
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Pantheon, RomePantheon, RomePantheon, RomePantheon, RomePantheon, RomePantheon, Rome
Pantheon, Rome
Pantheon, Rome
Pantheon, Rome
Pantheon, Rome
Pantheon, Rome
Pantheon, Rome
Phanteon Royal Suite welcomes you right in front of Piazza della Rotonda, just 10 minutes away from the splendid Piazza Navona and the Trevi Fountain. This guest house in Rome is great value for money, and offers modern and stylish rooms with free Wi-Fi and flat screen TVs. The rooms, some with views of the Pantheon , also feature air conditioning, tea and coffee making facilities, and some also have a relaxing Jacuzzi tub. Among the advantages of this guest house: a pleasant wellness center, an inner courtyard furnished with comfortable sofas, .....and a restaurant serving local cuisine. Show less
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Borghese Gallery and Museum
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Borghese Gallery and Museum, RomeBorghese Gallery and Museum, RomeBorghese Gallery and Museum, Rome
Borghese Gallery and Museum, Rome
Borghese Gallery and Museum, Rome
Borghese Gallery and Museum, Rome
Borghese Gallery and Museum, Rome
Borghese Gallery and Museum, Rome
Borghese Gallery and Museum, Rome
Another version of the Sleeping Hermaphrodite is at the Louvre, on a mattress created by Bernini in 1602 at Cardinal Scipione's request. The Sleeping Hermaphrodite inspired many copies. There's also a bronze one on display at the Prado Museum in Madrid.
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Palazzo Massimo alle Terme
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Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, RomePalazzo Massimo alle Terme, RomePalazzo Massimo alle Terme, RomePalazzo Massimo alle Terme, RomePalazzo Massimo alle Terme, RomePalazzo Massimo alle Terme, Rome
Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, Rome
Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, Rome
Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, Rome
Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, Rome
Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, Rome
Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, Rome
Four floors of classical and ancient art make up this must-see museum. Palazzo Massimo is part of the famous National Roman Museum. Here you can expect to find jaw-dropping frescoes and Roman marble sculptures. While there, be sure to check out the 2nd-century bronze excavation, Boxer at Rest.
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Basilica Parrocchiale Santa Maria del Popolo
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Basilica Parrocchiale Santa Maria del Popolo, Rome
Basilica Parrocchiale Santa Maria del Popolo, Rome
Basilica Parrocchiale Santa Maria del Popolo, Rome
Basilica Parrocchiale Santa Maria del Popolo, Rome
Basilica Parrocchiale Santa Maria del Popolo, Rome
Basilica Parrocchiale Santa Maria del Popolo, Rome
Legend holds that this congregation passed the Pincio Gardens was developed from a church worked to head out the underhanded soul of Nero. As the congregation of the Augustinian standards, with a fine Renaissance veneer, vault, and campanile, it was stretched out by Bramante in 1505, and later re-established by Bernini. Martin Luther, who was an Augustinian, lived in the request’s home amid his visit to Rome in 1510-11, and after the Reformation, the special raised area at which he had praised mass was avoided by different individuals from the .....request. One of the beautiful churches in Rome has its three passageways and side houses of prayer contain various tombs incorporating two in the choir by Andrea Sansovino. On the vaulting of the choir are frescoes by Pinturicchio portraying the Coronation of the Virgin? The side houses of prayer are especially fine: the second on the left was structured by Raphael in 1515 for the Chigi family, and the Cesari Chapel, in the north transept, contains two celebrated pictures via Caravaggio, the Conversion of St. Paul and Crucifixion of St. Diminish. Show less
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Rome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport
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Rome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, RomeRome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, RomeRome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, RomeRome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, RomeRome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, RomeRome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, Rome
Rome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, Rome
Rome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, Rome
Rome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, Rome
Rome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, Rome
Rome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, Rome
Rome Ciampino Giovan Battista Pastine Airport, Rome
The quickest way to get from the airport to central Rome is without a doubt the train. Departing from Rome Termini Station, the Leonardo Airport Express Train will have you at your destination just 30 minutes after your train departs. The only catch is the train fare, which at 14 Euro is about double what you’ll pay to catch the bus. All trains to the airport depart from platform 25 at Termini Station.
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Italian cooking classes in Rome
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Italian cooking classes in Rome, Rome
Italian cooking classes in Rome, Rome
Italian cooking classes in Rome, Rome
Italian cooking classes in Rome, Rome
Italian cooking classes in Rome, Rome
Italian cooking classes in Rome, Rome
If you want to make the most of Rome in 3 Days, this is my recommendation on how to do it. You'll get to see the most famous and important sites, mix in history with art, religious sites, parks, over and underground places to get a feel for the city overall. I’ve been to Rome many times, and still find new exciting things to visit each time, so hopefully, this will whet your appetite for the city as well as it’s pasta, pizza, and coffee. And if you threw your coin in the .....Trevi Fountain, you’re sure to be back again soon. Show less
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Altar of the Fatherland
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Altar of the Fatherland, RomeAltar of the Fatherland, RomeAltar of the Fatherland, RomeAltar of the Fatherland, RomeAltar of the Fatherland, RomeAltar of the Fatherland, Rome
Altar of the Fatherland, Rome
Altar of the Fatherland, Rome
Altar of the Fatherland, Rome
Altar of the Fatherland, Rome
Altar of the Fatherland, Rome
Altar of the Fatherland, Rome
Rome City Wonders is a tour company that has been in business for fifteen years. Their small group tours are dedicated to providing the highest quality customer service while sharing the history and sights of the world. In fact, they took out the prestigious Travellers’ Choice Award as the number one tour group in addition to the #1 Experience Worldwide by TripAdvisor for their Vatican Museums, Sistine Chapel, and St. Peter’s Basilica Tour. If you are only in Rome for one day, then these are the three places you must visit.
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